Long-Range: Hunt High and Hard

Finding a new secret hunting spot on public ground isn’t easy. This hunt started in June as my good friend Paul Klassen and I decided to find a new spot to hunt deer. We researched deer densities and talked to Fish and Game Officers to narrow down some areas that held promise. We also used Google earth to look at some terrain that had few roads and fewer ATV trails. I called the forest service and learned that the one main road into the area had been closed to motor vehicle traffic.  With this information, we had found the area, and a scouting trip later we knew we had chosen wisely.

hi73 sh mperkins 02Backpacking into the high country takes planning and logistics as well as the physical and mental discipline to put forth the effort needed. We decided to wait and hunt the last few days of the season hoping to see some bigger deer getting into the pre-rut.

In late October we parked at the trail head, dawned our 60 lb. packs and headed into the high country. We packed in 3.5 miles to our base camp and as we suspected, left most of the other hunters behind.

During the next 2 days we covered 19 miles on the trails into and out of some amazing deer country. We glassed large basins and aspen covered slopes and saw over 100 deer. The peace that comes to you sitting on a hillside glassing such beautiful country renews a hunter’s soul each year.

The second morning we headed into some new country and saw plenty of deer on almost every hillside and ravine. Several tempting smaller bucks found their way into our spotting scopes and we encouraged each other to hold out. Not that we were trophy hunting, but neither of us wanted to pack a small buck that far out.

At one o’clock I had been sitting on a hillside glassing for about an hour and finally saw my buck on a distant ridge 940 yards away working some does in the timber. One good look and I knew he was worth the effort.

I set off to get closer and climbed another ridge that was between the buck and my position. This is steep country and an hour later I gained the ridge I wanted and settled in to relocate the buck.

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Go Ballistic - .30 Nosler Review

Nosler has kicked the new year off with a proverbial bang. On January 8, 2016, Nosler announced the third member of their fast growing cartridge family. The 30 Nosler will now join the popular 26 and 28 Nosler both released within the past two years. The proven popularity of its predecessors generated demand for the latest Nosler cartridge release. The 30 Nosler shares the same parent case as the 26 and 28 Nosler cartridges. Nosler succeeded in collecting all the best attributes of currently available 30 magnums and is now combining them all in one cartridge.

According to Nosler new release, the 30 Nosler easily meets the velocity of the 300 Weatherby, headspaces on the shoulder like a 300 RUM, has an efficient powder column like the 300 WSM and fits in the same standard length action of a 300 Winchester Magnum. With the initial launch, Nosler will offer two loads for the new caliber -

1. Nosler® Trophy Grade™ Ammunition - 180gr AccuBond® - 3200fps

2. Nosler® Trophy Grade™ LR Ammunition - 210gr AccuBond® LR - 3000fps.hi73 gb 30 nosler

Hornady's ELD-X Long-Range Bullet

BY ARAM VON BENEDIKT

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The author poses with his wilderness bull elk, harvested cleanly with Hornady's new ELD-X bullet.

Opening my rifle bolt in the pre-dawn darkness before opening day, I slid three long cartridges into the magazine. The ruby-tipped projectile was an entirely new offering from Hornady and I was excited to give the magic bullets a try. Any branch-antlered bull elk careless enough to show himself was in danger of becoming test medium.

I’d be hunting one of Utah’s open-bull units where hunter success—even with a rifle—averages less than 10 percent. I’d saddled my horses the day before and packed 15 miles into the backcountry in an effort to escape hordes of hunters who nose their ATVs ever farther into the elk woods. A snowstorm spent its fury on me as I rode my horse above 10,500 feet and set up camp in a slushy patch of woods. Just enough daylight to scout left me delighted to find several bulls in the neighborhood.

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